Miss Cellaneous

Same handle across the board, basically: Find me by my username on other social network sites and at a certain large email provider starting with G.

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Posts tagged "natasha romanov"

caroljessie:

black widow: the name of the rose; quotes

(via idrilka)

actualmenacebuckybarnes:

i need more of natasha romanoff being brusque and unexpected when demonstrating physical affection to her loved ones (like a cat):

steve sits down on the couch with a beer and a bowl of pretzels and the next second natasha’s on his lap, drinking his beer and feeding…

septembriseur:

stillazarafteralltheseyears:

You know what I find truly remarkable about this scene? Is not just that she JUMPS OFF A SPEEDING ALIEN VEHICLE HUNDREDS OF FEET ABOVE THE GROUND but that she knows the EXACT MOMENT to make the jump to not only hit the roof (which, at that height and speed is an incredibly small target) but to hit it at a point where she isn’t going to a) immediately crash into a wall or b) be carried by her momentum over the other side and down a gazillion stories to the ground.

Natasha had to calculate IN HER HEAD IN THE MIDDLE OF A BATTLE the velocity of the alien vehicle, the size of Stark Tower’s roof, how high she was above it (so she wasn’t so high she’d be killed just by the fall to the roof), how long it would take her to make the jump successfully, what position to hit the roof in to minimize the physical damage, possibly even half a dozen other things. A miscalculation either way—too soon or too late—would’ve killed her.

Yeah, when she describes someone genius-level smart in CA:TWS as “slightly smarter than her but only slightly,” she’s NOT KIDDING. Natasha is probably either just as or very nearly as smart as Bruce or Tony or Jane or Betty, her training just meant those smarts were put to use in a different way. And that it’s something she’s trained to manipulate people’s expectations of, just like with her sex. IMO, if Natasha asks to have something explained, it’s not because she doesn’t understand, it’s because she doesn’t want the person she’s asking to KNOW she understands. Because her stock in trade is getting people to underestimate her and then using that against them. And this scene is the proof. Because when no one is watching, she is BRILLIANT.

I think it’s really important to point this out and talk about the gendering of intelligence in the Marvel universe as a whole. There are very few Marvel female heroes who are presented as Geniuses in that classic high IQ/seven doctorates/can solve any problem/slightly insane way. In fact, the only major character who springs immediately to my mind is Valeria Richards, and she’s a child. 

In part, this is probably due to the fact that this kind of intelligence is not considered an attractive female trait, and the primary purpose of most female characters is to be attractive to men. But I think this gifset & commentary highlight another reason: because many female characters would have to be Geniuses (in that way that signifies possession of the quality that IQ tests are supposed to, but don’t necessarily, measure) to do what they do, but the ways in which they exhibit that Genius do not fit within the traditional (masculine) understanding. For instance, Natasha proved herself at a very young age to be someone who was capable of phenomenally rapid problem-solving, skill-adoption, and general learning. That’s how she survived. Where Tony Stark and Reed Richards et al received doctorates, the prize for her intelligence was staying alive. 

I think that the same is true of other female superheroes. I’m thinking also of Storm, who canonically is multilingual, a gifted and expert thief, and whose mutant power seems to include an incredibly complex insight into the mechanism of weather patterns. (She, like Natasha, is also adept at rapid problem-solving.) And Maya Lopez has the ability to learn almost any skill to perfection simply by seeing it demonstrated— I can’t remember what this is termed in the comics, but in real life it would certainly be labeled genius.

So why is the super-intelligence of these women not acknowledged? I think we all know the answer to that.

(via rraaarr)

septembriseur:

As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice. (x)

I can’t help thinking also that such a major theme of this movie is secrecy: how dangerous it is to do things in the dark, because if you don’t have to confess to what you’re doing, you never really have to own it. You don’t have to own your acts, or the consequences of your acts. No one can hold you responsible. In Natasha’s case, shining a light into the dark exposes both the secret things that she’s done and the secret things that have been done to her— most of which are intimately connected. To expose herself means exposing herself both as perpetrator and victim, not only as someone who has done terrible things, but also as someone who has been vulnerable in terrible ways. For Natasha, that is a very major sacrifice. But at the same time, it’s an act of strength: a statement that she is strong enough, and enough at peace, to own herself, to contain her history. 

That, to me, is an arc of the movie that’s almost unspoken: from Natasha’s devotion to Fury, which hints at a past in which he has helped her grow towards that peace, to her interactions with Steve, which seem like a kind of self-test: if this person, this fundamentally decent and loving person, can trust her, then maybe…? And this is the climax of that arc, the point at which she herself has to judge whether she is someone who can be seen without shame. Someone who can stand up under that scrutiny. And she does. And that takes unbelievable courage.

(via cacchieressa)

After Me Comes the Flood (10035 words) by monanotlisa
Fandom: Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America (Movies), The Avengers (Marvel Movies), Iron Man (Movies)
Rating: Mature
Relationships: Steve Rogers/Natasha Romanov, Steve Rogers & Sam Wilson, Natasha Romanov & Sam Wilson
Characters: Steve Rogers, Sam Wilson (Marvel), Natasha Romanov, Maria Hill, Clint Barton, Nick Fury, James “Bucky” Barnes
Additional Tags: Partners to Lovers, Espionage, Action/Adventure, Romance, Bisexual Steve Rogers, Bisexuality, Post-Canon, Canon Compliant, Canon Related, Character Study, POV Female Character, Female Protagonist, Friendship, Food, Hurt/Comfort, Kissing, Post-Movie(s), POV Third Person, Sexual Content, Wordcount: Over 10.000, Healing Cock
Summary: She’s an international spy who just burned herself. He’s a national hero who just burned down a government agency. Together with their friend who flies like a bird, they fight crime. Or: Happy birthday, Steve Rogers!

fuckyeahblackwidow:

So I’ve decided fandom will forever be confused about Natasha’s name. Not, uh, coincidentally, comics writers have been confused about it for even longer.

The tricky bit is this: Natalia and Natasha are both forms of the Russian name Наталья. The Natalia/Natasha equivalency doesn’t exist in English, leading to all kinds of tail-chasing confusion re: which is real and which is fake. Natasha is a diminutive form of Natalia the same way Bill is for William. “Natalia” is not more authentic or more Russian, it’s just a bit more formal. And “Natasha Romanoff” is not an alias the way “Nadine Roman” or “Nancy Rushman” are.

The Romanoff/Romanova issue is just a question of transliteration. The Russian surname is Рома́нов, which is written as Romanoff or Romanov depending on your history book. Traditionally, Russian ladies take feminine endings to match their grammatical gender— Ivan Belov becomes Yelena Belova, Aleksandr Belinsky becomes Aleksandra Belinskaya. But the feminine endings often get dropped in English translation, e.g. Nastia Liukin, not Nastia Liukina. It’s a matter of preference.

If that’s too confusing, don’t worry, until about 1998 the comics had no idea what they were doing either.

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actualmenacebuckybarnes:

she pickpockets steve’s cell on the regular and programs the phone numbers of strange women into his speed dial (steve presses [1] and panics when a sweet female voice answers, oh I was wondering when you would call! natasha’s told me so much about you!)

she opens…

cutloosemcgoose:

disney-princess-at-heart:

image

We learn more about her past and learn more about where she came from and how she became in that film. The notion of exploring that even further in her own film would be great, and we have some development work with that.
FIEGE

Link to the actual article here.

(via devildoll)

“You’re a spy, not a soldier. Now you want to wade into a war. Why?”

(via cacchieressa)

Aaaand the Black Widow Prompt Meme is live!

black widow with fist extended, text reads black widow prompt meme

Entry can be found in Russia, or possibly Budapest.